United States Marine Corps Fourth Regiment Band in World War II, Last China Band
United States Marine Corps
Fourth Regiment Band in World War II
Imperial Japanese Ki-21 Sally Heavy Bombers Over Corregidor, Phillipine Islands
United States Marines defend the Philippine Islands at Corregidor and Bataan against Imperial Japanese air raids, shelling and landings following the attack by Japan against the United States of America at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and Manila Bay, the Philippines on December 7, 1941 and entry of the United States into World War II. Japanese Ki-21 heavy bombers over Corregidor Island photo above.
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US Marines in 1939
Pre-World War II Beijing (Peking), China
"Last China Band"
Color Film of Forbidden City
and Japanese Army Officer

Music: Begin the Beguine, Artie Shaw
Shanghai, China
November 28, 1941

The United States Marine Corps Fourth Regiment Band marching in Shanghai, China on November 28, 1941 only ten days before the December 7, 1941 attack by the Japanese Empire against the United States at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and Manila Bay, Philippine Islands.
 
Attack by the Imperial Navy of Japan against the United States Navy at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7, 1941
December 7, 1941 Attack by Imperial Japan Against the United States at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Includes Six Aircraft Carriers Which Launch 350 Fighters, Bombers and Torpedo Bombers
Attack by the Imperial Navy of Japan against the United States Navy at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on December 7, 1941
Attack by the Japanese Empire on Pearl Harbor Sinks or Badly Damages Eighteen US Navy Ships, Damages or Destroys 300 US Aircraft and Kills 2,403 US Military and Civilians
Tora! Tora! Tora! Air Show, Lest We Forget, Aircraft from Attack on Pearl Harbor in World War II Movie 1970
December 7, 1941 Military Offensive by Japan Against Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Continues Ten Hours Later Against Bombing Targets on Manila Bay in the Philippine Islands
March 26, 1942 Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carrier Akagi at Staring Bay, Dutch East Indies (Indonesia)
March 26, 1942 Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carrier Akagi at Staring Bay, Dutch East Indies (Indonesia), Fleet Refueling Point for Warships of the IJN, Sorties Out of Which Include Air Raids on Darwin, Australia February 19, 1942 and March-April 1942 Attacks Against Allied Forces and Shipping as Far West as Ceylon (Sri Lanka), South of India in Japanese Offensive Against the Allies China, Burma (Myanmar) and India, CBI Theater of Operations Before Refitting in Japan and June 1942 Fateful Rematch with US Navy Fleet at Midway
Battle of Midway, June, 4, 1942 dive-bombing run by just three aircraft on the Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carrier Akagi led by Lt. Richard Best of VB-6.
June 4-7, 1942 US Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless Dive Bombers Destroy Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carrier Akagi, Above, and Three Other IJN Aircraft Carriers, Kaga, Hiryu, Soryu, All Pearl Harbor Attack Participants, at the Battle of Midway Island
June, 4-7, 1942 Battle of Midway Island US Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless Dive Bombers Destroy Imperial Japanese Navy Aircraft Carriers Akagi, Kaga, Hiryu, Soryu

Shanghai, China
September, 1941
Shanghai, China
November 28, 1941

Troops of the First Battalion, Fourth Marines march down Nanking Road, on their way to the quays of the Whangpoo River preparatory to embarking on U.S. President Line ships for the Philippine Islands. The Marines share the crowded streets with examples of every mode of transportation available.
 
The troops are carrying “Heavy Marching Order” packs topped with neatly blocked campaign hats, armed with Springfield 1903 rifles at the left shoulder. Beneath each hat is the standard issue foul weather gear called a “pancho” and entrenching tool. At the head of this column pictured, the Fourth Marines Band can be seen breaking out into brighter sunlight. This proved to be a false foreboding as this historic field band would cease to be one in only ten more days.

Shanghai, China
November 28, 1941
Birds eye view of quays on the banks of the Whangpoo River, the port of Shanghai during the farewell of the Fourth Marines as it prepares to leave the International Settlement.
 
Throngs of people are seen gathered among the limousines of the world’s diplomatic, consular force and business firms watching troops of the First Battalion arrive led by the Fourth Marines Band (note: Sousaphone base horns just to left of picture center). Plainly seen in the line of march carrying a large banner are elements of Shanghai’s Volunteer Defense Force wearing kilts and playing bag pipes. Shortly after this resounding, amazing and confusing send off, the Marines depart for the Philippines ending their duty in Shanghai after many years.
Western Pacific Ocean
and East Asia

World War II in the Pacific
April 1941 Until July 1942 Flying Tigers, American Volunteer Group (AVG), US Pilots Initially Resupplied Through Burma (Myanmar) and French Indochina, Defend Yunnan Province, Republic of China from Bombing and Invasion by Japanese Army Moving West Through Major Cities Since 1937 Against Strong Chinese Resistance and Causing High Civilian Casualties
Flying Tigers Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Fighter
South China Sea Region French Colonial Map
French map of Indochina region
French Indochina (Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia) and Southwest Republic of China Major Railroad Link from Haiphong Harbor (Hai Phong) Through Hanoi (Ha Noi) to Kunming (Yunnan Fou), Largest City in Yunnan Province
Nazi Germany occupies Paris, France
May 1940 Nazi Germany Occupies Paris, France
Tripartite Pact signed between Germany, Japan and Italy
September 1940 Germany, Japan and Italy Sign Tripartite Pact Military Alliance and Hitler Controlled Vichy France Government is Forced to Allow Imperial Japan to Occupy French Indochina
American Volunteer Group Flying Tigers P-40 Warhawks attack Japanese Bombers
Tensions Build as Japan Blocks Rail Route at Haiphong Harbor to Further US Military Aid for Republic of China Resistance Against Brutal 1937 Imperial Japanese Army Invasion and Continued Incursion West into Yunnan Province, While US Government Concerned About Access to South China Sea Resources Such as Rubber, Oil and Minerals, Demands Japanese Military Withdraw from French Indochina, Seizes Japanese Assets in US and Imposes Sanctions Against US Exports to Japan such as Refined Petroleum Products and Scrap Metal, Pictured Above, Flying Tigers, American Volunteer Group (AVG) US Pilots, Curtiss P-40 Tomahawk Fighters with Republic of China Wing Markings Strafing Attack on Japanese Heavy Bombers at Forward Airbase
Corrregidor Island
November 28, 1941 US Marine Corps Fourth Regiment Ships Out from Shanghai, China for Corregidor Island and Bataan Peninsula in Manila Bay on the Main Island of Luzon, the Philippine Islands Still Seemingly at Peace Only Ten Days Before Imperial Japan Initiates Major Military Attacks there and on Oahu Island, Hawaii
 Japanese Attack Pearl_Harbor and Manila Bay
December 7, 1941 Imperial Japanese Government Preempts Expected US Oil Embargo Enforcement by Attempting to Eliminate US Navy Pacific Fleet in Hawaii and the Philippines as well as Attacking British Military at Hong Kong and Singapore
Japanese Attack Pearl_Harbor and Manila Bay
 
US B-17 Bomber and Fighter Aircraft at Iba Field, Luzon Island, The Philippine Islands in October 1941 Prior to the Imperial Japan Attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
October 1941 US Boeing B-17 Bomber and Fighter Aircraft at Iba Airfield, Luzon Island Which is Attacked Among Other Philippine Islands Targets Just Ten Hours After the December 7, 1941 Imperial Japanese Attack at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
B-17 versus Zero
US Boeing B-17 Bomber and Imperial Japanese A6M Zero Fighter
US Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Fighter Strikes Back at Imperial Japanese Navy Dive Bomber during Attacks on Pearl Harbor and Manila Bay
US Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Fighter Strikes Back at Imperial Japanese Navy D3A Val Dive Bomber
Flying Tigers AVG Sayonara Sally Ki-21 Bomber over Rangoon Burma 12-23-41
December 23, 1941 Flying Tigers, American Volunteer Group (AVG) US Pilots, Curtiss P-40 Warhawk Fighters with Republic of China Wing Markings Over Rangoon, Burma (Yangon, Myanmar) Repel Sixty Japanese Ki-21 Sally Heavy Bombers
Imperial Japanese Ki-21 Sally Heavy Bombers Over Corregidor, Phillipine Islands
Japan Bombs Corregidor
December 7, 1941 US and Allied Military Defend Corregidor Island Until May 6, 1942 Order to Surrender After Sustained Japanese Shelling and Bombing, Ki-21 Sally Heavy Bombers Over Corregidor Photo Above, and Increasing Casualties on Both Sides in Close Combat, Embarrassing Delay in the Announced Immediate Collapse of US Armed Resistance on Corregidor Against Overwhelming Odds While Running Out of Ammo Repulsing Waves of Enemy Landings Causes Imperial Japan to Divert Such Significant Resources that the Postponed Major Assault on Australia Proves Impossible
Radar First Combat Uses by US at Pearl Harbor and Manila Bay
Radar, the Word Still Classified, First Combat Uses by US Army and Marines Mobile Air Warning Services During Initial Imperial Japanese Attacks at Pearl Harbor and Manila Bay
General Douglas MacArthur on Corregidor Island in 1942
March 11, 1942 US Army General Douglas MacArthur, Vowing to Return, Leaves Malinta Tunnel on Corregidor Island in Manila Bay, the Philippine Islands for Australia by PT Boat and B-17 Bomber While Imperial Japan Continues Siege of Shelling and Air Raids Against Surrounded US Marines, Army and Navy Personnel on Island Until Surrender is Ordered After Five Months of Armed Resistance and with Casualties Increasing on May 6, 1942 When Japanese are Finally Able to Land Tanks on Corregidor
Type 97-Kai ShinHoTo Chi-Ha medium tank
May 6, 1942 Two Type 97-Kai ShinHoTo Chi-Ha Medium Tanks and One M-3 Stuart Tank Captured on Luzon Are Landed by Imperial Japanese Army Assault Forces on Corregidor Island
IJN_Rikusentai Dutch East Indies December 1942
December 1942 Imperial Japanese Marines (Rikusentai) Special Naval Landing Forces (SNLF), Stage Landing for Cameras in Dutch East Indies (Indonesia), on Same Day as Attack on Pearl Harbor Initiate First Ground Assault on Philippine Islands at Batan Island North of Luzon, Identified by Anchor Insignia and Rising Sun Naval Ensign is used as Flag and on Armored Vehicles and Other Shore Equipment While Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) Use White Flag with Red Circle for Same Purposes
May 6, 1942 surrender to Imperial Japanese on Corregidor Island
May 1942 Surrender
on Corregidor Island
 
Honor Versus Dishonor: The Pacific’s 4th Marine Regiment
 
By MATTHEW M. BURKE | STARS AND STRIPES
Published: April 5, 2018

CAMP FOSTER, Okinawa — Army Lt. Gen. Jonathan Wainwright ordered the surrender of U.S. forces in the Philippines on May 6, 1942, following an overwhelming six-month Japanese onslaught.

Marine Col. Sam Howard — commander of the 4th Marine Regiment — ordered the national and regimental colors burned rather than see them fall into enemy hands. The Marines reluctantly went into a brutal captivity at the hands of the Japanese.

The 4th Marine Regiment hasn’t been stationed in the continental United States since then. It is the only regiment whose lineage is rooted on the American mainland to deploy to the Pacific and never be rotated back, Marine officials said.

Rumors have swirled among Marines that the regiment is doomed to wander the Pacific — much like the mythical ghost ship The Flying Dutchman — due to the dishonor over surrendering. It is the largest organized Marine unit to ever do so in battle.

Before elements of the regiment traveled to South Korea recently for exercises Foal Eagle and Key Resolve, current 4th Marine Regiment commander Col. Kevin Norton pushed back against that myth, saying it is because of honor, not dishonor, that his Marines are stewards of the Pacific.

“Like most things, there’s rumor and misconception,” said Norton, who has spent more than 10 years with the regiment in various leadership positions. “We were still reeling from Pearl Harbor and we had to pick and choose where we were going to send forces to, so in many ways, the Marines and the U.S. Army and the Filipinos kind of got left hung out to dry a little bit out of necessity, because the U.S. Navy and U.S. Army had to kind of get their act together and mobilize in order to get over here.”

The 4th Marine Regiment was activated at Puget Sound, Wash., on April 16, 1914, with Col. Joseph Pendleton — namesake for Camp Pendleton, Calif. — as its inaugural commanding officer. The unit’s first duty station was San Diego.

In June 1916, 4th Marines was dispatched to the Dominican Republic to intervene on behalf of the government in their civil war, the Marine Corps said. This would be the first time the unit would see combat, and it was awarded two Medals of Honor for heroism.

The unit was then dispatched to Shanghai, China, in March 1927 to protect American interests in the face of yet another civil war. Known as the “China Marines,” they stayed in country for nearly 15 years.

The China Marines departed for the Philippines on Nov. 27 and 28, 1941, after being surrounded by the invading Japanese. They had been in the Philippines for nine days when the Japanese attacked to coincide with the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Fourth Marines Flag Corregidor
May 5, 2017 US Marine with Okinawa Based 4th Marine Regiment Takes Photo of Unit Colors at the Pacific War Memorial Museum at Corregidor Island, Philippines
 
Surrender
 
The 4th Marine Regiment engaged the Japanese for the first time on Dec. 12, 1941, the Marine Corps said. After arriving at Subic Bay, it had been tasked with guarding Olongapo Naval Station and a naval base at Mariveles.

As the Japanese bore down on Manila from the north and defeat seemed all but assured, 4th Marines in Olongapo evacuated to Mariveles and then to Corregidor, the fortified island off the southern coast of the Bataan Peninsula. They prepared and strengthened defensive positions as the Japanese closed in.

The Japanese made landfall on Corregidor Island on May 5, 1942, the Marine Corps said. The regiment inflicted heavy casualties on the Japanese invaders, decimating the first two attempted landings; however, they were no match for Japanese planes, tanks and Bataan-based artillery. The Japanese gained a foothold on the beach and expanded it, pushing toward Wainwright’s headquarters.

The Marines lost all of their heavy guns and were almost out of ammunition. All seemed lost.

“Feeling that further resistance was useless and fearing a possible massacre of 1,000 sick and wounded personnel in Malinta Tunnel, Gen. Wainwright decided to surrender,” a unit history said.

Isolated pockets of Marines continued to fight four hours after the surrender went into effect, until news of the order trickled down.

“The Marines were beside themselves,” Norton said. “They fought valiantly for several days and then ultimately Gen. Wainwright ordered the surrender because the higher headquarters folks were inside of a tunnel and they didn’t have all the information and the communications had been severed.”

Norton said Wainwright did what he thought was right, and the Marines had to follow orders. The 4th Marine Regiment ceased to exist.

“I don’t think the United States nor Gen. Wainwright understood how the Japanese were going to view prisoners,” Norton said. “There were some big-time atrocities. There were executions regularly. It was a brutal captivity. Most of those Marines who we refer to as the ‘old 4th Marine Regiment’ spent all of World War II in prisoner of war camps or they simply died in POW camps; it was that horrific.”
   
History Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 323 VMFA-323 Death Rattlers Insignia
   
Proud Lineage
 
While Howard’s Marines tried to stay alive in brutal prison conditions, the 4th Marines was resurrected Feb. 1, 1944, with members of the 1st Marine Raider Regiment, a commando-style unit that had fought with distinction in the Makin Island, Guadalcanal, Central Solomons and Bougainville campaigns.

“If you talk to World War II vets, there was such a proud lineage of the 4th Marines that it was a big deal for them to rename that Raider regiment the 4th Marines,” Norton said.

The “new” 4th Marines participated in the recapturing of Guam and the seizure of Okinawa at the cost of 4,000 of their lives, the Marine Corps said. World War II ended with Japan’s surrender Aug. 15, 1945, following the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

The 4th Marines — who were awarded five Medals of Honor for service during the war — were chosen as the first American combat unit to land in Japan for the occupation. They were there to welcome the “old” 4th Marines, emaciated and in poor health, as they were liberated from POW camps.

“They held a parade for many of the prisoners,” Norton said. “It was a good homecoming for those guys because they realized the regiment was still alive.”

The 4th Marines was deactivated in 1949 only to be reactivated three years later for the Korean War. However, they arrived in Japan after the armistice that ended the conflict was signed. They were sent to Hawaii, the closest they would ever get to the continental United States.

Through the years, the regiment has served with distinction in combat in Vietnam and through advisers sent to Iraq and Afghanistan, leading to nearly another dozen Medals of Honor. They were the last Marine regiment to depart Vietnam in 1969 and have been on Okinawa ever since.

Today, 4th Marines is the anchor for the unit deployment program, accepting stateside battalions into their ranks on six-month rotations to the Pacific.

“Unlike units stationed in the United States permanently, we’re kind of on the tippy, tippy part of the spear and our readiness is at the highest levels permanently,” Norton said.

“When the Marines really learn the history, all that rumor and conjecture of, ‘Hey, the surrender was dishonorable,’ you just have a totally different perception … the Marines had nothing to do with the surrender. There was no dishonor in it.”
United States Marine Corps LVT landing at Peleliu 1944
September 15, 1944 US Marine Corps LVT (Landing Vehicle Tracked) Assault on Fortified Imperial Japanese Army Garrison at Peleliu Island in Allied Pacific Ocean Island Hopping Campaign from Guadalcanal August 1942 to Okinawa April 1945
United States Marine Corps LVT landing at Peleliu 1944
 
750_Kamikaze USS CVE-71 Kitkun Bay Leyte Gulf 10-25-44
October 25, 1944 Escort Aircraft Carrier USS Kitkun Bay CVE-71 in the Operation to Liberate the Philippine Islands is Damaged by Imperial Japanese Kamikaze A6M Zero Fighter Aircraft Attack
kamikaze 11-25-44 attack on USS Essex_CV-9
November 25, 1944 Aircraft Carrier USS Essex CV-9 Hit by Imperial Japanese Kamikaze Aircraft in Battle of Leyte Gulf
November 25, 1944 USS Intrepid CV-11
November 25, 1944 Aircraft Carrier USS Intrepid CV-11 Hit by Kamikaze in Leyte Gulf One of Four Aircraft Strikes on Intrepid During the Philippine Islands Liberation Operation
November 25, 1944 USS Intrepid CV-11
 
Okinawa USMC LVT landing
April 1, 1945 USMC 2nd Battalion, 22nd Regiment LVT (Landing Vehicle Tracked) on Green Beach, Last Major Battle of WWII at Okinawa Island, an Amphibious Invasion by Many Metrics Larger than D-Day and 98 Day Long Final Reckoning for Conventional Imperial Japanese Military Forces
Okinawa 04-01-45 29th Marines M-4 Sherman Tank
April 1, 1945 Riflemen of the 29th Marine Regiment Ride a M4A3 Sherman 105mm of Company A, 6th Tank Battalion During the 6th Marine Division Drive on Chuda, Okinawa
U.S. Marines use a 37mm gun pounding Japanese pill boxes on May 9, 1945, during the Battle of Okinawa
May 9, 1945 US Marines use 37mm Gun to Pound Imperial Japanese Pill Boxes During the Battle of Okinawa
750_US Marines control ridge Naha Okinawa May 1945
May 1945 US Marines Control Ridge at Naha, Okinawa
750_F4U_Corsair_1559197048133
April 9, 1945 Pilots from US Marine Corps Fighter Squadron, VMF-312 Checkerboarders, First to Land Their Vought F4U-1D Corsairs on Kadena Airfield, Okinawa Soon Followed by VMF-323 Death Rattlers, VMF-322 Fighting Gamecocks and a Single Night Fighter Squadron, VMF(N)-543 Night Hawks, Operating Grumman F6F(N) Hellcats to Provide Interception and Close Air Support for the Liberation of the Island of Okinawa
United States Marine Corps FG-1D Corsair VMF-323 rockets Okinawa 04-03-45
April 3, 1945 United States Marine Corps Vought FG-1D Corsair of VMF-323 Death Rattlers Fires Rockets in Close Air Support of Allied Ground Troops on Okinawa Island
United States Marine Corps FG-1D Corsair VMF-323 rockets Okinawa 06-10-45
June 10, 1945 United States Marine Corps Vought FG-1D Corsairs of VMF-323 Death Rattlers Patrol Okinawa Island
History Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 323 VMFA-323 Death Rattlers Insignia
August 1943 United States Marine Corps Vought F4U-1 Corsairs of VMF-323 Death Rattlers get Their Name from a Rattle Snake Encounter While Training in North Carolina, Now VMFA-323  Based with Other Squadrons of Third Marine Aircraft Wing, 3D MAW, at Miramar Marine Corps Air Station, San Diego, CA
January 2020 New Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Stealth Fighter, Third Marines Air Wing, at Miramar Marine Corps Air Station, San Diego, CA
January 2020 Lockheed Martin F-35C Lightning II Stealth Fighter, Aircraft Carrier Variant (CV), Third Marine Aircraft Wing, 3D MAW, Miramar Marine Corps Air Station, San Diego, CA
Marine Corps Air Station Miramar China Bell
China Bell
Master Sergeant
Donald LeRoy Versaw
United States Marine Corps
Retired / WWII POW

Last China Band
Fourth Marines Musicians
Memorial Band Hall

3D MAW Band
Third Marine Aircraft Wing
Miramar
Marine Corps Air Station
San Diego, CA

Battleship USS Missouri off Okinawa kamikaze 04-11-45
April 11, 1945 Battleship USS Missouri BB-63 off Okinawa Japanese A6M Zero Fighter Kamikaze Causes Minor Damage
USS Sangamon CVE-26 kamikaze 05-04-45
May 4, 1945 Escort Aircraft Carrier USS Sangamon CVE-26 Operating off Okinawa Coast Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Hien Ki-61 Tony Fighter Kamikaze Attack
Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Hien Ki-61 Tony Fighters Attempt to Intercept US Boeing B-29 Superfortress Bomber
Imperial Japanese Army Air Force Hien Ki-61 Tony Fighters Attempt to Intercept US Boeing B-29 Superfortress Bomber
Imperial Japanese Ki-51 Sonia Light Bomber/ Dive Bomber
July 26, 1945 British Heavy Cruiser HMS Sussex Sustains Minor Damage in Dutch East Indies (Indonesia) Japanese Ki-51 Sonia Light Bomber/Dive Bomber Kamikaze Strike to Armored Hull
Heavy Cruiser HMS Sussex Kamikaze strike 07-26-45
 
US Navy Task Force 38 off the coast of Japan 1945
August 17, 1945 Task Force 38 of US Navy Third Fleet off Coast of Japan Two Days After Empire Agrees to Surrender
Ronald Searle Drawing August 28, 1945 Planes Dropping Pamphlets Announcing End of War Over Changi Gaol Prisoner of War Camp Singapore to Allied POW Personnel from Britain, Australia and Canada
August 28, 1945 Planes Dropping Pamphlets Announcing End of War Over Changi Gaol Prisoner of War Camp Singapore to Allies from Britain, Australia and Canada in this Contemporaneous Drawing by Fellow POW Ronald Searle, British Army
Battleship USS Missouri Japan WWII Surrender
September 2, 1945 Empire of Japan Officials Sign World War II Surrender to US Army General Douglas MacArthur Aboard Battleship USS Missouri BB-63 in Tokyo Bay as Japanese War Crime Suspects are Investigated and Prisoner of War Camps in Japan are Liberated After Three Years of Combat, Captivity, Deprivation and Forced Labor for Many Allied Personnel
Battleship USS Missouri Japan WWII Surrender
 
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Landing Vehicle Tracked
LVT
US Marine Corps
1952 TV Program

Written by Last China Band Member, WWII POW,
First Lieutenant George Francis, USMC, Retired
New Scans of Original Photo Prints from Third Marines Air Wing Band, Miramar Marine Corps Air Station, San Diego, CA and Marine Corps Musicians Association Historian
Last China Band Members and Former World War II Prisoners of War Martin Eichman, Jack P. Rauhof, Kenneth Marshall and Other Late 1940's and 1950's USMC Bands Original Photo Prints from Third Marine Aircraft Wing Band, 3rd MAW, Miramar Marine Corps Air Station, San Diego, CA and Marine Corps Musicians Association Historian
Band Photos After WWII
Miramar 3D MAW Band

 
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and the Philippines, December 7, 2021
 
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